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Section 2: Definitions of Maintenance

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Purpose of Definitions

Categories have been designed to assist the districts in the performance of maintenance work and are intended to identify work to be performed with maintenance funds. Maintenance funds should not be used to perform construction work.

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Definitions of Maintenance Work

Maintenance work is categorized into three areas:

  • routine maintenance
  • preventive maintenance
  • major maintenance.

    All three maintenance categories may be performed with state forces or by contract; however, most preventive and major maintenance work should be contracted.

    The following definitions of maintenance activities should be used in determining the type of work activity when addressing planning and budgeting.

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Contracted Work

The table below defines maintenance categories for contracted work.

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Routine Maintenance

Preventive Maintenance

Major Maintenance

Contracts for this work should be developed as “Routine Maintenance Contracts” (RMC) through the Construction/ Maintenance Contract System (CMCS) and may be locally let if estimated to cost less than $300,000.

Contracts for this work should normally be programmed through the Transportation Planning and Programming Division as “Contracted Preventive Maintenance” (CPM) projects.

Contracts for this work should be developed according to the Design Division “2-R” standards and should normally be programmed through the Transportation Planning and Programming Division as "Major Maintenance Program" (MMP) projects.



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Travel Way

The table below defines travel way maintenance categories.

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Routine Maintenance

Preventive Maintenance

Major Maintenance

Pavement-related work to include restoration of pavement service-ability including: recondition, rebuild, level up, and overlay. This would include, but not be limited to: pavement repair, crack seal, bituminous levelups with light overlays to restore rideability (overlays not to exceed total average depth of 2”), additional base to restore rideability, and seal coats.

Pavement-related work performed to prevent major deterioration of the pavement. Work would normally include, but not be limited to: milling or bituminous level-ups to restore rideability, light overlays (overlays not to exceed total average depth of 2”), seal coats, crack sealing and microsurfacing. Preparatory work such as milling, repairs or level-ups may also be performed.

Pavement-related work to strengthen the pavement structure for the current and projected future traffic usage. Work should include: restoration of pavement serviceability of roadway. This would include but not be limited to: recondition and stabilize base and subgrade, add base, level up, light overlays (overlays not to exceed total average depth of 2”) and seal coats. Pavement widening (to achieve a maximum travel way width of 26’) can be considered maintenance if done to correct a maintenance problem.



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Shoulder and Side Approaches

The following table defines maintenance categories for shoulder and side approaches.

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Routine Maintenance

Preventive Maintenance

Major Maintenance

All shoulder work to restore to its originally constructed condition including: recondition, rebuild, level-up and overlay. This work would also encompass installation and maintenance of public access drives, crossovers, turn lanes and mailbox turnouts.

All shoulder work to prevent major deterioration of the pavement including: milling or bituminous level-ups to restore cross section, light overlays (overlays not to exceed total average depth of 2”), seal coats, crack sealing and microsurfacing. Shoulder repair and widening not to exceed 26’ full roadway width.

All shoulder work to restore to its originally constructed condition and/or to strengthen the pavement structure for the current and projected future traffic usage, including but not limited to: recondition and/or stabilize base and subgrade, add base, level up, light overlays (overlays not to exceed total average depth of 2”) and seal coats. Adding shoulders, if done to correct a maintenance problem, (maximum width of 4’ total for both sides) can be considered major maintenance.



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Roadside

The table below defines roadside maintenance categories.

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Routine Maintenance

Preventive Maintenance

Major Maintenance

All work to maintain the roadside including but not limited to: maintenance and operation of rest areas and picnic areas, litter removal, mowing, placing herbicides, tree and brush trimming and removal, repair and upgrading of guard rails and extruder terminals, repairing slides and side slopes, placing topsoil, sod, shrubs, etc. to reestablish proper grade and vegetative cover and landscaping, removal or treatment of roadside hazards, installation and maintenance of environmental protection devices, and mitigation of spills or hazardous materials.

None.

None.



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Drainage

The table below defines maintenance categories for drainage.

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Routine Maintenance

Preventive Maintenance

Major Maintenance

Replacement, repair and installation of curb, gutter, riprap and underdrain; cleaning, repairing or replacing culverts, storm sewers, erosion controls; reshaping drainage ditches and channels.

Removal of debris and siltation from channels to prevent damage to structures or flooding of roadways. Repair or replacement of slopes and/or riprap to prevent damage to structures or embankments.

Constructing new drainage channels or modification of drainage structures to increase drainage capacity. Performed only to correct a maintenance or safety problem or to protect public or private property.



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Structures

The table below defines maintenance categories for structures.

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Routine Maintenance

Preventive Maintenance

Major Maintenance

Repair of substructures, superstructures, decks, joints, approach slabs and railing; spot painting; repair and operation of movable bridges; installation of temporary bridges; repair and installation of fender systems.

Steel structure cleaning and repainting or the installation of other coatings; installation of bridge deck protection; joint cleaning and sealing or replacement.

Bridge rehabilitation, reconstruction, or replacement. Replacement of structures only as a result of major disaster when no other funds or programs are available.



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Traffic Operations

The following table describes maintenance categories for traffic operations.

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Routine Maintenance

Preventive Maintenance

Major Maintenance

Installation, repair and replacement of signs, delineators, illumination, signals and related appurtenances; installation and replacement of striping, pavement graphics, raised pavement markings and rumble strips; maintenance of traffic control cabinets and the corresponding attachments (including but not limited to loop detectors, video cameras, changeable message signs, etc.).

Replacement of striping, pavement graphics, raised pavement markings, and rumble strips may be performed in conjunction with a resurfacing operation.

Installation of new signal systems to upgrade outdated designs.



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Emergency Operations

The table below defines maintenance categories for emergency operations.

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Routine Maintenance

Preventive Maintenance

Major Maintenance

Assistance to traffic during accidents including traffic control, removal of debris and spilled cargo, and snow and ice control. Assistance to traffic during other natural disasters such as floods, tornadoes, hurricanes and fires; removal of debris from the roadway after natural disasters. The District Engineer determines that immediate action is needed to respond to imminent threat to life or property or to prevent disruption of the orderly flow of traffic and commerce. Work off of the right of way, such as assistance to cities, counties and individuals, can be performed only when directed by the local Disaster District Chairman (usually the local Department of Public Safety Captain), Director of the Division of Emergency Management or the Governor.

None.

None.



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