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Section 3: Plan Set Preparation

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Overview

The plans are original drawings (or reproductions) approved by the engineer, which are part of the contract and which clearly show the location, character, dimensions, and details of all proposed work. The next paragraphs discuss

  • Purposes of plans
  • Result of unclear/incorrect plans
  • Plan sheet sequence.

Purposes of Plans. The three main purposes of the plans are

  • For prospective bidders to prepare a bid as accurately as possible
  • For state construction inspector-contractor teams to oversee and perform construction efficiently and accurately
  • To provide an accurate record of the construction for future reference.

Result of Unclear/Incorrect Plans. Accurate and clear plans are essential in accomplishing the purpose of accurate bids, efficient construction, and good permanent records. Unclear and/or incorrect plans usually result in increased costs and more work for State personnel for the following reasons:

  • Incomplete or inaccurate plans require additional handling and processing and, therefore, cost the state more time and money to get the contract to letting.
  • Data that is unclear or interpreted in more than one way could result in higher bid prices by contractors. Unclear data also could result in claims for more compensation and/or more working days by the contractor after award of the contract.
  • Incorrect or incomplete plans can precipitate change-orders which require additional processing, usually increase costs, and may cause project delays.

Plan Sheet Sequence. The plan sheet sequence has been recommended by a statewide Total Quality Initiative committee.

  • I. General
    • Title Sheet
    • Project Layout/Index
    • Typical Section
    • General Notes
    • Estimate and Quantity
    • Consolidated Summaries.
  • II. Traffic Control Plan
    • Typical Section
    • Phases Narrative
    • Phase Layouts
    • Detour Layout and Barricade Layout sheets
    • Temporary Traffic Signals, Illumination
    • Standards.
  • III. Roadway Details
    • Survey and Control Index Sheets
    • Horizontal and Vertical Control Sheets
    • Alignment Data Sheets (Optional)
    • Plan and Profile
    • Intersection Details
    • Driveway Details
    • Miscellaneous Details
    • Standards.
  • IV. Retaining Wall Details
    • Wall Layouts
    • Standards.
  • V. Drainage Details
    • Hydraulic/Hydrologic Data
    • Culvert Layouts – All Types – Bridge Classification
    • Plan and Profile
    • Standards.
  • VI. Utilities
    • Existing Utilities (P and P’s) Layout
    • Proposed Utilities (P and P’s) Layout
    • Standards (for each utility type).
  • VII. Bridges
    • Bridge Hydraulic Data Sheets
    • Bridge Layout, Detailed Quantity Summary, and Structural Details grouped together for each bridge
    • Structural Standards.
  • VIII. Traffic Items
    • Traffic Signal Layout
    • Standards
    • Illumination
    • Standards
    • Signing
    • Standards
    • Pavement Markings
    • Standards
    • Traffic Management System (TMS)
    • Standards.
  • IX. Environmental Issues
    • SW3P’s
    • Sensitive Areas
    • Wetland Mitigation Plan
    • Miscellaneous.
  • X. Miscellaneous Items
    • SW3P
    • Landscaping/Irrigation.

This guidance can be applied to both in-house and consultant-produced plans. The rest of this section follows the outline and describes these requirements, which must be addressed during the actual production of the project plan sheets:

  • General types of plan sheets
  • Traffic control plan
  • Roadway details
  • Retaining wall details
  • Drainage details
  • Utilities
  • Bridges
  • Traffic items
  • Environmental issues
  • Miscellaneous items
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General Types of Plan Sheets

These are the plan sheets discussed below:

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Title Sheet

The Title Sheet (for an example of a Title Sheet, see titlesht.) is the first sheet of the plans. It should be neat and contain all of the information as described below. The purpose of the Title Sheet is to:

  • Establish the location of the project(s)
  • Describe the nature of the work proposed by the plans
  • Index the contents of the plans

The following are the contents of the Title Sheet:

  • Title Block
  • Design Speed and Average Daily Traffic (ADT) Volumes
  • Length of Project
  • Highway Name And Number, County And Project Number
  • Limits
  • Project Classification and Type of Work
  • Location Map
  • Index of Sheets (for an example of an Index of Sheets Sheet, see indexsht.)
  • Adoption Date of Governing Specifications
  • Exceptions, Equations, and Railroad Crossings
  • Signature Block(s)
  • Legend of Conventional Symbols

The next paragraphs discuss these contents.

Title block. This is located in the upper right hand corner and identifies the plans by project number, district designation, county, control-section-job number (CSJ), and highway name and number.

Design speed and average daily traffic (ADT) volumes. Show the design speed of the highway in miles per hour (mph) or kilometers per hour (km/h) depending on whether the project is in English or metric units. Design speed and ADT are required to be shown on the Title Sheet of all projects except those where N/A is shown on Form 1002. For detailed explanation of use of design speed and ADT refer to Chapter 5, Section 2: PS&E Submission Data Sheet (Form 1002).

Length of project. For each CSJ, show breakdown of roadway and bridge lengths in feet or meters truncated to two decimal places. The breakdown should also show roadway and bridge lengths in miles or kilometers truncated to three decimal places. The total length shown should match the DCIS P1 screen.

Highway name and number, county and project number. These are shown in large capital letters to facilitate identification and processing.

Limits. Show limits of proposed construction. This should match the limits shown in the project authorization and on the DCIS Project Identification (P1) Screen.

Project classification and type of work. The project classification text should read, “For the construction of XXXX,” where the XXXX corresponds to the project classification shown on the lower right-hand corner of the DCIS P1 screen. The type of work text should read, “Consisting of YYYY,” where the YYYY corresponds to the type of work field shown on the DCIS C1 screen. A listing of the project classification abbreviations shown on the P1 screen is located in DCIS User Manual, Appendix B. As an alternative, the type of work description can be made to match the proposal cover, which is “for work consisting of XXXX,” where XXXX corresponds to the type of work field on the DCIS C1 screen.

Location map. Provide a legible map of suitable size showing the location of the project in relation to physical landmarks, other highways, and/or intersections. In addition, the project limits by CSJ(s), county and city boundaries, reference markers, graphic map scale and north arrow should also be shown. The beginning and end of each project should contain the stations, CSJs, and reference markers for each CSJ.

Index of sheets. Show sheet numbers and title or abbreviations as they appear on the sheet. All sheets are to be listed, including OMITTED sheet numbers. Show (M) after the abbreviation for metric standard detail sheets. All standard sheets listed on the title sheet will bear the asterisk symbol (or other symbol) to identify them as standard sheets. The index of sheets is accompanied by the responsible engineer’s approval note for use of standard sheets included in the plans. (See Section 3, Engineer’s Seal and TxDOT Copyright Requirements, for more information.)

Adoption date of governing specifications. On state projects, indicate “Special Labor Provisions for State Projects.” For Federal-Aid projects, show title and date of appropriate required contract provisions.

Exceptions, equations, and railroad crossings. List by station numbers and lengths. Show as NONE if not applicable.

Exceptions are the station number limits and lengths which are excluded from a project. Equations are used to show the transition of the project from one set of station numbers to a different set.

Signature block(s). Signature blocks are typically required for the Area Engineer in charge of the plans, Director of Transportation, Planning and Development or District Design Engineer, District Engineer, and Director of the Design Division. Projects that require additional signature blocks are as follows:

  • Traffic signals, signing and delineation, pavement marking and traffic management – Director, Traffic Operations Division
  • Projects designed by consultants: consultant engineer
  • Projects involving cities, counties, irrigation or water districts, corps of engineers, etc.: appropriate official
  • Bridge replacement or rehabilitation projects – Director of Bridge Division

Legend of conventional symbols. This legend can be shown on the lower left hand corner. Most Title Sheets already contain these symbols; therefore, verify that the symbols conform to those on the plan sheets and location map.

NOTE: For projects that involve multiple CSJs, individual project lengths, or lengthy indices the above information can be included on supplemental sheets.

For projects which require inspection by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR) during the construction phase, include this note:

TDLR INSPECTION REQUIRED

This serves as a reminder to construction personnel to inform the TDLR staff and coordinate an appropriate time for them to visit the project site and inspect pedestrian-related elements.

For PS&E submission requirements and policy on TDLR, go to Chapter 5, Section 6.

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Project Layout

This sheet(s) (For an example of a Project Layout Sheet, see prolay.) is intended as an overview of the project. Other information that may be included is horizontal alignment data, advance project warning signing, or information not shown elsewhere in the plans.

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Roadway Typical Sections

Roadway typical sections (for an example of a Roadway Typical Sections Sheet, see typsect) should be as simple as possible and still provide the necessary construction data. A general representation of the nature of construction in each portion of the project is necessary, but a multitude of details can be confusing. The purpose is to show all the components and dimensions of the roadway within the right-of-way perpendicular to the centerline for each change of existing features or proposed roadway. The following are the contents of the Roadway Typical Section Sheet:

  • Existing Typical Section
  • Proposed Typical Section
  • Profile Grade Line (PGL)
  • Station Limits
  • Depths
  • Roadway Cross Slopes
  • Roadway Side Slopes
  • Dimensions
  • Unique Descriptions
  • Utility Location

A discussion of these contents appears below.

Existing typical section. This section shows approximate depths, widths, and station limits of existing roadway materials.

Proposed typical section. This section shows dimensions, depths, and limits for each type of material in the proposed pavement structure. A typical section is also necessary for such features as ramps, detours, crossroads, etc. Barrier and metal beam guard fence should be shown if applicable. In addition, limits of other applicable items of work such as topsoil and seeding, curb and gutter, etc., may also be shown.

Profile grade line (PGL). The PGL shows the location of roadway that represents the grade line shown on the plan and profile sheets. Also, other needed control points such as project baseline or centerline, roadway centerline, and super-elevation pivot points should be shown.

Station limits. This section shows station limits for each section. Each typical section should be checked to ensure that a section has been shown for all of the project roadway and that the roadway widths correspond with those shown on the plan and profile sheets.

Depths. This section shows thickness in inches or millimeters of each layer in the pavement structure. The approximate quantity per station may be shown for each section. Each type of material should be clearly identified. If stabilization is proposed, indicate the type.

Roadway cross slopes. Show cross slopes for proposed typical sections in percent (%).

Roadway side slopes. Show side slopes as a ratio of vertical to horizontal distances (V:H) (Metric) or (H:V) (English).

Dimensions. Show dimensions for:

  • Subgrade crown width
  • Base crown width
  • Pavement width
  • Stabilized material width
  • Lane widths
  • Shoulder widths
  • Right-of-way widths
  • Side slopes and ditches
  • Berm widths
  • Curb and gutter
  • Prime coat widths.

Unique descriptions. Include any unique descriptions of the pavement structure or explanatory notes such as the following:

  • Disposition of old base material and, if salvaged, limits of salvage and limits of replacement
  • Indicate contrasting color aggregate for shoulders if applicable
  • Dimensions for calculating payment.

Utility location. If a utility line is predominant in a section of roadway, show line identity and approximate depth (if known). A note similar to the following should be used: “Locations of Underground Utilities are Approximate.”

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General Notes

These notes (for an example of General Notes, see general), created as described in Chapter 3, Section 5, General Notes of this manual, are placed on plan sheets by the responsible Austin office, except in the case of district review projects.

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Estimate and Quantity Sheets

The next paragraphs discuss these aspects of the Estimate and Quantity (E&Q) Sheets (For an example of an E&Q Sheet, see eq2):

  • Purpose
  • Use
  • References.

Purpose. The purpose of E&Q Sheet is to provide a list of all the pay items and estimated quantities in the contract. This sheet also provides a space for final quantities once a project has been completed. Item numbers, descriptive codes, Special Provision numbers, item descriptions, units of measurement and bid alternates are also shown.

Use. An E&Q sheet summarizes the work to be done, if there is more than one CSJ or project in the plans or if local participation is involved. They also simplify the plans by showing the total quantities of each item of work involved in the construction of the roadway. If the quantities are accurate, the contractor will be encouraged to submit lower bid prices with minimized contingency costs.

References. The final E&Q Sheet is plotted in the Austin Office except for district review projects. The E&Q Sheet input format and plotting procedures are described in detail in the DCIS User Manual, Chapter 4, Instructions for E&Q Sheets. The District’s Automation Administrator may also be contacted.

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Summary Sheets

The purpose of the Summary Sheet (see tcpsum, sumlrg, and sumsml) is to supplement or replace the summary of work totals on individual plan sheets and to bring together the quantities for all the items of work. The contents of the Summary Sheet are discussed in the paragraphs below:

  • Work type, quantity, and location
  • Separate quantities
  • Contractor’s information quantities
  • Bid items matching estimate.

Work type, quantity, and location. Summary Sheets should indicate type, quantity, and location of work for individual pay items of the proposed project.

Separate quantities. Summary Sheets should show separate quantities for each control or project, city participation, county participation, etc.

“Contractor’s information” quantities. Quantities shown on the Summary Sheet(s) “For Contractor’s Information Only” should be noted as such.

Bid items matching estimate. Description of bid items should conform with the description shown on the estimate. It is recommended that the individual item headings be kept as simple as possible. As a minimum, the item number, general description, and units of measure should be shown.

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Traffic Control Plan

The next subsections discuss

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Traffic Control Plan (TCP) Sheets

The paragraphs below cover these TCP Sheet (see typseq, tcptypxs, and tcpdrvwy) topics:

  • Purpose
  • Standard sheets
  • Sequence of work
  • General notes.

Purpose. Traffic Control Plan (TCP) Sheets, in detail appropriate to the complexity of the project, should provide for moving traffic through or around the construction zone in a safe, expeditious, and clear manner. They are also used to provide for protection of the traveling public, work forces, pedestrians, construction equipment, and the work zone from accidents through the use of traffic control devices.

Standard Sheets. When practical, standard sheets developed by the divisions or districts should be used. Each work zone is different and the standard plan sheets do not cover all situations. In these cases, the standard plan sheets can be used as a starting point from which the traffic control plan can be developed.

Sequence of Work. Sequence of work sheets should be included in the plans if the proposed work causes complicated traffic movements or construction procedures within the project limits. It should be evident from the traffic control sheets what arrangement of construction signs, pavement markings, construction pavement markings, traffic control devices, etc., are needed to control traffic at all locations in every sequence of work. The layouts should show the projects’ construction staging.

The typical cross sections of different construction phases should be included on the sequence of work sheets. These cross sections are very helpful in further clarifying the width of work zones and the method of traffic handling. The more clear and thorough the TCP is, the smoother and safer the construction will be. Explanatory narrative can be included on these sheets, in the General Notes (under Item 502), or in a triple-zero Special Provision.

For an example of a traffic control plan and sequence of work sheet, see typseq and tcptypxs. For an example of a miscellaneous traffic control plan details sheet, see tcpdrvwy.

General notes. On minor projects, the TCP can usually be described by General Notes under Item 502. Most plans should include the Barricade and Construction Standard Sheets.

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Traffic Standards

Work zone traffic control standard plan sheets are available on graphics from the Traffic Operations Division’s Traffic Engineering Section (TRF-TE). These sheets can be downloaded from TxDOT’s Internet site ( http://www.dot.state.tx.us/insdtdot/orgchart/cmd/cserve/standard/toc.htm).

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Roadway Details

The following roadway detail discussion covers

  • Survey Control Index sheets
  • Horizontal and Vertical Control Sheets
  • Alignment Data Sheets (optional)
  • Plan and Profile (P&P Sheets)
  • Other sheets.

Survey Control Index Sheets

The next paragraphs cover these Survey Control Index Sheet topics:

  • Purpose GuidelinesContents

Purpose. The purpose of the Survey Control Index Sheet is to show an overall view of the project and the relationship of primary monumentation and survey control used in preparation of the project. This sheet should be used in conjunction with the Horizontal and Vertical Control Sheet.

Guidelines. This sheet should be provided for all 4R projects. In addition, this sheet should be provided for 3R projects that involve substantial changes to the vertical grade and/or horizontal alignment of an existing facility and/or right of way acquisition.

The control points shown on the Survey Control Index Sheet should correspond with the information shown on the Horizontal and Vertical Control Sheet. The Survey Control Index Sheet should be signed and sealed by the professional engineer (PE) in direct responsible charge of the surveying. This sheet may also be signed and sealed by the responsible registered professional land surveyor (RPLS) if required by the district.

Contents. The following are the contents of the Survey Control Index Sheet:

  • Overall view of the project and primary control monuments set for control of the projectIdentification of the control pointsBaseline and/or centerline Graphic (Bar) ScaleNorth ArrowPE signature, seal and date.

(For an example of a Survey Control Index Sheet, see Survey Index.)

Horizontal and Vertical Control Sheets

The next paragraphs cover these Horizontal and Vertical Control Sheet topics:

  • Purpose
  • Guidelines
  • Content

Purpose. The purpose of the Horizontal and Vertical Control Sheet is to identify the primary survey control and the survey control monumentation used in preparation of the project. This sheet should be used in conjunction with the Survey Control Index Sheet which contains an overall view of the project and the relationship of primary monumentation and survey control used in preparation of the project.

Guidelines. This sheet should be provided for all 4R projects. In addition, this sheet should be provided for 3R projects that involve substantial changes to the vertical grade and/or horizontal alignment of an existing facility and/or right of way acquisition.

The Horizontal and Vertical Control Sheet should be signed and sealed by the professional engineer (PE) in direct responsible charge of the surveying. This sheet may also be signed and sealed by the responsible registered professional land surveyor (RPLS) if required by the district. Control point location maps should be drawn to scale and provide sufficient information so that the point can be located.

Contents. The following are the contents of the Horizontal and Vertical Control Sheet:

  • Location for each control point, showing baseline and/or centerline alignment and North arrow
  • Station and offset (with respect to the baseline or centerline alignment) of each identified control point.
  • Basis of Datum for horizontal control (base control monument/benchmark name/number, datum)
  • Basis of Datum for vertical control (base control monument/benchmark name/number, datum)
  • Date of current adjustment of the datum
  • Monumentation set for Control (Description, District name/number and Location ties)
  • Surface Adjustment Factor and unit of measurement
  • Coordinates (SPC Zone and surface or grid)
  • Survey closure information
  • Relevant metadata
    • Graphic (Bar) scale
    • PE signature, seal and date
    • TxDOT title block (District name, County, Highway No., and CSJ).

For an example of a Horizontal and Vertical Control Sheet, see H&Vcontrol.

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Alignment Data Sheets

Alignment Data Sheets shall be provided for all 4R projects. In addition this sheet should be provided for 3R projects that involve substantial changes to the vertical grade and/or horizontal alignment of an existing facility and/or right of way acquisition. The alignment data sheets should (at a minimum) include the following information:

  • curve data (if applicable)
  • PC, PI, PT station and coordinates
  • curve radius and degree of curve
  • deflection angle
  • tangent bearings and lengths
  • stations and station equations (if applicable)
  • station/offset information (in relation to other alignments within the project limits)
  • Engineer's seal, signature and date

An imported COGO output file is recommended.

For an example of a horizontal Alignment Data Sheet, see horzalgn.

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Plan and Profile Sheets

The next paragraphs cover these Plan and Profile (P&P) Sheet. (For an example of a P&P Sheet, see pavplanp.) topics:

  • Purpose
  • Guidelines
  • Plan view contents
  • Profile view contents.

Purpose. The purpose of the P&P Sheets is to show the horizontal and vertical alignments and may describe other work to be done. These sheets will also show existing features which are typically obtained by aerial photography.

Guidelines. Clarity and completeness is the rule to follow in the preparation of P&P Sheets. The plan and profile views are normally shown on the same sheet but may be shown on separate sheets where plan views take up a great deal of space and it would be impractical to show the profile view on the same sheet. Graphic scales vary depending on the type and size of project and the amount of information required. For metric projects, 1:200, 1:500, and 1:1000 are the most common scales used for the plan views with respective 1:20, 1:50, and 1:100 vertical scales. For English projects, 1 inch equals 100 feet and 1 inch equals 50 feet are the most common scales used for the plan views with respective 1 inch equals 10 feet and 1 inch equals 5 feet vertical scales.

Plan view contents. The following are the contents of the plan view portion of the P&P sheets:

  • Beginning And Ending Of Project
  • Centerline Stationing, Tangent Bearings, And Equations
  • Horizontal Curves
  • Superelevation
  • Intersecting Roads And Driveways
  • Existing And Proposed Culverts
  • Location Features
  • Sheet Totals For Roadway Items
  • Miscellaneous.

Beginning and ending of project. Show project number, station number control-section number and reference marker with arrow leader for each control break. Stations should increase from left to right on the plan sheets.

Centerline stationing, tangent bearings and equations. Station numbers should be indicated at 500 feet (100 meters) intervals with tick marks every 100 feet (20 meters).

Horizontal curves. Show points of curvature, and points of tangency on centerline with small circles/bubbles. Show the points of intersection as a small triangle. List the delta, radius curve, radius, tangent, and length somewhere on the sheet identifying each curve with the point of intersection station.

Superelevation. Show stationing of transitions from normal crown to full superelevation and from full superelevation to normal crown. Indicate emax used.

Intersecting roads and driveways. Show centerline station, name, property line widths, and proposed radii. Show limits of construction (usually to the right-of-way line of the main roadway).

Existing and proposed culverts. For cross drainage structures show stationing, and for parallel drainage structures show the stationing and offset.

Location features. Show north arrow, benchmark data, right-of-way lines, utility and channel easements, right-of-way markers, county lines, city limit lines and stations, section corners, survey lines, and control-of-access lines.

Sheet totals for roadway items (optional). Show item numbers, description, estimated quantities, and units of measurement. Place on right side of sheet.

Miscellaneous

  • Show bridges and their beginning and ending stations.
  • Show super-elevation direction, rates, and beginning and ending transition stations, and indicate axis of rotation.
  • Show right-of-way widths and roadway widths at each break and at the beginning and ending of each sheet.
  • Reference roadway layout sheets if applicable for details that cannot be shown on plan sheets.
  • Show retaining wall locations.
  • Show ditch blocks and alignment of special ditches and channels. In lieu of the plan sheets, this information can be shown on other drainage layout sheets.
  • Show railroad crossings, cross fences, and channels with direction of flow arrows.
  • Illustration of toes and tops of slopes is sometimes beneficial.

Profile view contents. The following are the contents of the profile view portion of the P&P Sheets:

  • Proposed Grade Lines
  • Natural Ground Profile
  • Elevations
  • Utilities
  • Stationing And Elevations
  • Structures/Culverts.

Proposed grade lines. Use a heavy solid line. Show points of vertical intersection as a small triangle. Show points of vertical curvature and points of vertical tangency with small circles/bubbles and give curve data near point of vertical intersection. Show percent grade on tangents to 3 decimal places. Give description for profile grade line (e.g., Alignment A, Rt. Gutter, Left Frontage Road).

Natural ground profile. Use a light dashed line and give description (e.g., Existing Centerline FM 76).

Elevations. Show proposed and existing elevations at 50 feet (20 meter) intervals.

Utilities. Show opposite plan view and give elevations, if known, or give depth dimensions, if known.

Stationing and elevations. Show station numbers along bottom and datum elevations along sides of sheet.

Structures/culverts. Show below and in line with plan view.

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Other Sheets

For larger projects, some of the information which might normally be located on P&P Sheets can be located on other plan sheets such as the roadway and bridge layout sheets in order to improve clarity and completeness. The following are defined below:

  • Intersection details
  • Driveway details
  • Miscellaneous details
  • Roadway standards.

Intersection details. Used to show pavement contours, sidewalks, pedestrian ramps, and any details requiring a larger scale (for clarity) than the main P&P Sheets. (For an example of paving details, see intrdtls.)

Driveway details. They are used to provide pertinent construction details such as pavement structure, grades, limits of construction, etc.

Miscellaneous details. For items such as curb types, standard driveways, traffic barrier modifications, sidewalk details, curb ramp details, etc. (For an example of miscellaneous paving details, see miscpav.)

Roadway standards. Such as guardrail, crash attenuators, concrete pavement standards, etc.

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Retaining Wall Details

The discussion below covers these retaining wall topics:

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Retaining Wall Layouts

Refer to the Geotechnical Manual for more information on retaining wall layouts and foundation design. The next paragraphs deal with

  • Guidelines
  • Plan view contents
  • Profile view contents.

For an example of a retaining wall layout sheet, go to the Geotechnical Manual, Chapter 6.

Guidelines. Horizontal and vertical controls for retaining walls, in plan and elevation views, with typical wall cross section. Show top-of-wall line, and proposed ground line (typically 1-foot minimum above bottom of wall) in profile view.

Plan view contents. The following are the contents of the plan view portion of the retaining wall layout sheets:

  • Beginning And Ending Of Wall
  • Controlling Roadway Stationing, Tangent Bearings, And Equations
  • Horizontal Curves
  • Typical Wall Cross Sections
  • Intersecting Roads
  • Drainage Appurtenances
  • Location Features
  • Sheet Totals For Retaining Wall Items (optional).

Beginning and ending of wall. Show, begin and end stations, of retaining wall alignment including offsets.

Controlling roadway stationing, tangent bearings and equations. Station numbers should be indicated at 500 feet (100 meter) intervals with tick marks every 100 feet (20 meters).

Horizontal curves. Show points of curvature, and points of tangency on centerline with small circles/bubbles. Show the points of intersection as a small triangle. List the delta, radius curve, radius, tangent, and length somewhere on the sheet identifying each curve with the point of intersection station.

Typical wall cross sections. Show location of wall in relation to the sidewalk, roadways, rail, coping, and drainage details.

Intersecting roads. Show the location of all roads or driveways within the limits of the wall.

Drainage appurtenances. Show the location of all drainage appurtenances located within the limits of the wall.

Location features. Show north arrow, right-of-way lines, and utility and channel easements.

Sheet totals for retaining wall items (optional). Show item numbers, description, estimated quantities, and units of measurement. Place on right side of sheet.

Profile view contents. The following are the contents of the profile view portion of the retaining wall layout sheets:

  • Proposed Grade Lines
  • Natural Ground Profile
  • Elevations
  • Utilities
  • Stationing And Elevations
  • Drainage Appurtenances.

Proposed grade lines. Use a heavy solid line. Show point of vertical intersection as a small triangle. Show points of vertical curvature and points of vertical tangency with small circles/bubbles and give curve data near points of vertical intersection. Show percent grade on tangents to 3 decimal places. Show top and bottom of wall grade lines.

Natural ground profile. Use a light dashed line and give description (e.g., Existing Centerline FM 76).

Elevations. Show proposed and existing elevations at 50 feet (20 meter) intervals.

Utilities. Show opposite the plan view and give elevations, if known, or give depth dimensions, if known.

Stationing and elevations. Show station numbers along bottom and datum elevations along sides of sheet.

Drainage appurtenances. Show elevation and align with plan view.

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Retaining Wall Standards

These include standards such as cast-in-place wall, mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) wall, special traffic rail, etc.

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Drainage Details

Refer to the Hydraulic Design Manual for information on drainage design details. The drainage detail discussion below covers:

  • Drainage Area Map Sheets
  • Hydraulic Calculation Sheets
  • Culvert Cross Sections, Layout, and Detail Sheets
  • Plan and Profile Sheets
  • Miscellaneous details
  • Drainage standards.
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Drainage Area Map Sheets

Drainage area maps are drawn at a convenient scale to include all of the drainage areas of the project. The purpose of this sheet is to document the size and location of the watersheds used to size each of the drainage structures and/or appurtenances. The following are the contents of Drainage Area Map Sheets (For an example of a Drainage Area Map Sheet, see drainare. For an offsite drainage area map, see offdrain.):

  • Major tributaries or streams being crossed
  • Major highways and/or streets should be shown for viewer orientation
  • Drainage areas are to be numbered for cross-reference in the runoff table
  • Location of structure and/or stream crossing.
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Hydraulic Calculation Sheets

Each bridge classification stream crossing will have its own hydraulic data sheet. Hydraulic calculations for culverts consist of a runoff computation table and a culvert computation table. Additional tables will be required to show the computations for storm sewer runs and inlets if those appurtenances are included in the plans. The purpose of this sheet is to verify structure design and to document calculations. The following are the contents of the Hydraulic Calculation Sheet:

  • Bridge classification structure requirements
  • Runoff computations
  • Standard calculation tables.

Bridge classification structure requirements. Each stream being crossed by a bridge classification structure will have on its hydraulic calculation sheet: the floodplain cross section, run-off calculations indicating the method used, an elevation vs. discharge curve, and a cumulative conveyance curve if there is a multiple flow divide. (For examples of a Bridge Class Culvert Layout Sheet, see brdgculv and culvlay.)

Runoff computations. Runoff computations for culverts, storm sewers, and inlets need to indicate the method used (i.e. Rational or USGS) and the values used for intensity, coefficient of run-off, etc., used to arrive at the runoff volume for each drainage area.

Standard calculation tables. The Bridge Division’s Hydraulics Section has standard calculation tables for the culvert, storm sewer, and inlet computation that may be used in the plans. (For an example of runoff computations, see runcomp; for drainage inlet computations, see inltcomp; for storm sewer computations, see sscomp.)

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Culvert Cross Sections, Layout and Detail Sheets

Each culvert involved in the proposed work should have a cross section which shows the work to be done, the description of the culvert, and a summary of estimated quantities. In addition, bridge class culverts should also have layouts that show the same information. The following are the contents of Culvert Cross Section, Layouts and Detail Sheets:

  • North Arrow
  • Skew Angle
  • Centerline of Roadway
  • Beginning and End of Structure (show begin and end stations and elevation for bridge class culverts)
  • Roadway Width
  • Centerline of Structure
  • Direction of Flow
  • Description of Existing Structure (should be included for documentation purposes)
  • Roadway Cross Section
  • Earthwork Slope(s)
  • Flowline Elevations
  • Slope of Culvert
  • Wingwall Type
  • Overall Length of Culvert
  • Description for Proposed Culvert with Appropriate Standards
  • Hydraulic Data (Headwater and Tailwater Elevations)
  • Estimated Quantities shown in tabulated form
  • Scale - (vertical and horizontal scales are relative to sheet size)
  • Existing Ground Line
  • Special Details (include details such as bill of reinforcing if the proposed work is not shown in a standard or provide location of such details elsewhere in the plans)
  • Right-of-Way Lines and/or Easements.

Also, every bridge class structure throughout the nation is assigned a National Bridge Inventory Number. This is a 15-digit number with the last three digits being the permanent structure number. The National Bridge Inventory Number is composed as follows:

  • The first two digits are the district number.
  • The next three digits are the county number.
  • The next digit is always 0.
  • The next four digits are the control number.
  • The next two digits are the section number.
  • The last three digits are the permanent structure number.

The permanent structure number (PSN) is assigned by the Bridge Division. Each bridge classification structure is assigned a separate number. This PSN should be reflected in the heading for the bridge category of work in the estimate. The user should contact the Bridge Inspection Branch of the Bridge Division to obtain a PSN for all existing or proposed structures containing bid items in the plans estimate.

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Plan and Profile Sheets

Plan view will show locations of inlets, storm sewers, culverts, ditches, etc., with all roadway detailing not shown. Profile view will show storm sewer runs (type, size, and length) with corresponding profile of details such as

  • Existing and proposed ground
  • Trench excavation protection
  • Existing utilities

For an example of a drainage system plan view, see drainsht. For a drainage system profile view, see drainpro.

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Miscellaneous Details

For items such as

  • Inlet modifications
  • Pipe bedding details
  • RC pipe connections
  • Block sodding
  • Flume or channel details.

For an example of miscellaneous drainage details, see miscdrn.

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Drainage Standards

Drainage standards include

  • Box culverts
  • Wingwalls
  • Inlets
  • Safety end treatments.
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Utilities

These utility items need to be considered:

  • Existing utilities
  • Proposed Utility (P&P) Layouts
  • Utility Standards.
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Existing Utilities

Separate sheets would be provided only if the project also includes proposed utilities. Existing utilities are usually included on the roadway P&P Sheets.

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Proposed Utility (P&P) Layouts

Consider utility P&P layouts if such work is included in the project.

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Utility Standards

Consider utility standards if necessary.

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Bridges

For detailed information on structural detailing see the Bridge Detailing Manual. Bridge Sheets to consider include

  • Bridge hydraulic data
  • Bridge layout.
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Bridge Hydraulic Data

These data can be shown on a separate sheet or may be included in a separate hydraulic report.

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Bridge Layout

For an example of a bridge layout, go to the Bridge Detailing Manual. Each bridge to be constructed or widened has a layout which clearly illustrates the proposed work drawn at a usual scale of 1 inch equals 50 feet horizontally and 1 inch equals 5 feet vertically. (1:10 or 1:20 if the original is a full size (22x34) sheet or 1:20 or 1:40 if the original is half size (11x17) sheet). The following paragraphs deal with these aspects of bridge layout:

  • National Bridge Inventory Number
  • Plan layout
  • Profile layout
  • Layout review considerations.

National bridge inventory number. Every structure throughout the nation is assigned a National Bridge Inventory Number. This is a 15-digit number with the last three digits being the permanent structure number. The National Bridge Inventory Number is composed as follows:

  • The first two digits are the district number.
  • The next three digits are the county number.
  • The next digit is always 0.
  • The next four digits are the control number.
  • The next two digits are the section number.
  • The last three digits are the Permanent Structure Number (PSN).

The PSN is assigned by the Bridge Division. Each bridge classification structure is assigned a separate number. This PSN should be reflected in the heading for the bridge category of work in the estimate. The user should contact the Bridge Inspection Branch of the Bridge Division to obtain a PSN for all existing or proposed structures containing bid items in the plans estimate.

Plan layout. The following are the contents for the plan layout:

  • Reference Line, Centerline, or Profile Grade Line (bearing and location)
  • Beginning and Ending Bridge Stations and Elevations
  • All Bent Stations and Bearings
  • Armor Joint type, Location, and Size of Seal (if used)
  • Width (overall, roadway, shoulders, etc.)
  • Approach Slab and Curb Returns
  • Direction of traffic and/or Stream Flow
  • North Arrow
  • Correct Plotting of Test Holes, Identification, and Location
  • Horizontal Clearances (as required, for structures, utilities, RR tracks, etc.)
  • Right-of-Way (if applicable)
  • Horizontal Curve Data (if applicable)
  • Cross slope and/or Superelevation (if applicable)
  • Limits of Riprap, Blockout Around Column
  • Skew angle(s) of Structure and/or Bents
  • Railing Type (specify rail type and show nominal face of rail)
  • Beam Line Numbers (consistent with span details).

Profile layout. The following are the contents for the profile layout:

  • Overall Length of Structure
  • Lengths and Types of Units/Spans
  • Overall length, limits of payment, and Type of Railing (rail post spacing if required to clear slab joints)
  • Vertical Curve Data and Grade
  • Beginning and Ending Bridge Station and Elevation
  • Fixed/Expansion Conditions at All Bents
  • Minimum Calculated Vertical Clearances and Other Clearances as Required (structures, utilities, RR tracks, etc.)
  • Existing and Proposed Ground Lines Clearly Marked
  • High Water Elevation (if applicable)
  • Grid Elevations and Stations
  • Column Heights
  • Number, Size, Length, and Type of Foundations
  • Test Holes, Data, and Information
  • Bent numbers must be circled
  • Show Typical Transverse Section (overall roadway widths, shoulder width, sidewalks, cross slopes and railings)
  • Clearance sign(s) and other signs attached to bridge
  • Traffic signal detectors in bridge slab
  • Permanent Structure Number (PSN)
  • Limits and type of riprap
  • Design Speed, Average Daily Traffic (ADT), and Functional Classification.

Layout review considerations. The following are important considerations when reviewing a bridge layout:

  • Check layout against all structural details for compatibility to be sure that all features correspond.
  • Check foundation against structural details and special foundations notes specified by the foundation engineer to be sure spread footings or number and direction of batter of piles are in agreement.
  • Checker should initial sheet after checking for the corrected details.
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Detailed Summary

This is a detailed summary of the bid items for all bridges, also including PSN identification and bearing seat elevations. For an example of a detailed summary sheet, go to the Bridge Detailing Manual.

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Structural Details

These are details for abutments, bents, framing plan, slab details, etc.

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Bridge Standards

Some of these standards are for beams, deck details, expansion joint, rails, etc. See Bridge Standards at: http://www.dot.state.tx.us/business/disclaim.htm for a complete list of standards.

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Traffic Items

These traffic items are discussed below:

  • Traffic signal layout
  • Electrical and illumination
  • Signing and delineation
  • Pavement markings and markers
  • Traffic Management System
  • Traffic standards.

Preferably, standard sheets associated with each subsection below should be listed under each traffic item independently.

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Traffic Signal Layout

Basic intersection layout showing signal pole/mast arm locations, conduit runs, loop detectors, lanes, and signal head arrangements, etc. Summary tables including all signal bid items should be shown for each signalized intersection. (For examples of Traffic Signal Layout Sheets, see siglay1 and siglay2.)

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Electrical and Illumination

These are layouts of lighting pole, mounted luminaire, electrical service, and conduit run locations, etc.

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Signing and Delineation

Sheets which could be necessary are Signing and Delineation Layout Sheets (showing locations of all signs and delineators), overhead sign bridge details (elevation view of sign and support), and sign details (showing sign face dimensions and text). Summary of Large Signs Sheets and Summary of Small Signs Sheets would also be included. (For an example of a Summary of Large Signs, see sumlrg; for an example of a Summary of Small Signs, see sumsml.)

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Pavement Markings and Markers

These are roadway plan views showing all proposed markings, denoting type, color, width, etc. Include standard pavement markings and raised pavement markers. (For an example of a Permanent Pavement Marking Layout Sheet, see prmpavm.)

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Traffic Management System

Such sheets may be needed on large (typically freeway) projects to denote surveillance and control systems items, such as traffic cameras, changeable message signs, vehicle detection, conduit runs, and other details for smart highways type features.

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Traffic Standards

Some of these standards are sign standards (IE, IM, R, etc.), sign mounting details (SMD), overhead sign bridge/support standards (OSB, etc.), pavement marking (PM), electrical details (ED), roadway illumination details (RID), signal mast arms (SMA, DMA, MA), etc.

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Environmental Issues

The next subsections cover these environmental issues:

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Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans

A Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SW3P) consists of plan sheets, which primarily address temporary erosion control measures during project construction (For examples of SW3P Sheets, see swppp and swppp3p.). An SW3P is required (by 1990 Clean Water Act) for all projects. The Design Division has directed however that if there is any soil disturbance at all, at predictable locations, a SW3P sheet(s) should be included in the plans. This would as a minimum be the narrative, partially standardized sheet which is always the first sheet of the SW3P portion of the plans; the other sheets will show the locations of the various erosion control features. For jobs which disturb no soil (seal coats, overlays, etc.), a standardized General Note (and selected bid items in the estimate or by force account) will serve as the SW3P. The Temporary Erosion Control Item is required on all projects and makes reference to a SW3P in the project.

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Wetland Mitigation Plan

Projects that unavoidably disrupt waters of the United States which have been further determined to be wetlands will require mitigation (replacement) of such wetlands. Approval of mitigation plans must be obtained from the Corps of Engineers such that the project can be authorized under a Section 404 permit. These plans may include layout of replacement wetlands, grading details, possible vegetation replacement, etc., and it is highly desirable to complete these documents (for submittal to the Corps) as early as possible, as these sheets are also used as part of the Section 404 permit application.

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Environmental Standards

These are erosion control standards (sediment control fence, construction exits, etc.).

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Environmental Permits, Issues and Commitments (EPIC) Sheet

The EPIC sheet must be completed by the district listing all environmental commitments, issues and conditional requirements affecting the contractor and their work on that specific project. The sheet can be supplemented by specific details shown on other plan sheets but the areas of concern should be shown on the EPIC for the contractor’s information. The sheet should not be used to reiterate what is already shown in environmental permits for all projects. This sheet is specific to the project it is included in, and should address areas the contractor should be aware of. Late changes to commitments that affect contractor work requirements are to be included in the PS&E by an addendum. Include everything from conditional requirements from resource agencies to environmental commitments made to landowners and other entities (e.g. tree preservation) on the EPIC sheets. EPIC sheets that affect contractor work requirements, further detail contractor obligations in the plans. Changes in commitments after letting will require either a written notice to the contractor (e.g. for identifying a restricted area) or a change order for added or reduced work.

It is not required to have an engineer sign and seal the EPIC sheets. It is a standard sheet which can be found as a design detail sheet at the department website. It can be modified electronically on a project by project basis. Click on EPIC to see a sheet.

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Miscellaneous Items

These miscellaneous items appear below:

  • Removal Sheets
  • Landscaping/irrigation
  • �Railroad plans.
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Removal Sheets

These sheets are usually included on major reconstruction projects when the right-of-way is cluttered with many existing features. The sheets would consist of roadway plan views showing the items for contractor removal, such as structures, pavements, guard rails, and other existing appurtenances. (For an example of Removal Sheets, see remsht.)

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Landscaping/Irrigation

These include appropriate layouts and details if such aesthetics treatments are included in the project.

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Railroad Plans

If railroad work is in the project, necessary plans may include Plan and Profile of new track, grade crossing layouts (planking, signal location, delineation of TxDOT/RR work responsibilities), track typical section, and track details, etc. A Railroad Bridge Layout Sheet would be included with other project bridge layouts, if any. These railroad plan sheets are not labeled as Exhibit A in final plans sets. For an example, see the Bridge Detailing Manual.

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